Give Us Back Our Country

An American’s Call For Political Reform

Michael Ken

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Photo by Joseph Chan on Unsplash

A Political Dark Age

I remember learning about the Dark Ages when I was a young child. At that time, I believed this period, marked by lawlessness, a lack of valid education, horrid living conditions, and superstitious beliefs, was an unavoidable step away from ignorance towards progress. Tragically, however, this period was a painful and unnecessary step backward from a long history of knowledge that was lost during this time of turmoil. It was a misstep that stifled human progress, in the West, for a thousand years.

Our country, too, was once moving down a logical path towards the things Americans value most like life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness for all its citizens. In recent years, however, logic, reason, and common sense, those tools that have provided the advances we embrace, have taken a back seat to a new, uninformed, and emotionally charged group of political followers.

Democracy’s Achilles Heel

The strength of a democracy is that it is a government of the people, by the people. While a democratic society can manage and protect its citizen’s rights, one has to ask what happens when a specific group grows large enough to hijack a country’s democracy, seizing control of its national goals. Becoming a majority, after all, requires no special education, expertise, experience, competence, or leadership skills. There are no qualifications other than having a large number of supporters.

Democracy’s vulnerability is that it is a form of government that trusts larger groups will embrace ethical solutions to national problems. In this ideation, a small group’s desires are deemed less important solely because it lacks support. This way of framing a society’s needs holds that a larger group of people are somehow more qualified to make informed decisions when electing a government, an argument that seems unlikely at its best and absurd at its worst.

The underlying assumptions of a democracy are that the people will naturally pursue what is noble, correct, and true; that all decisions will be considered through an ethical lens; and that the many will safeguard the freedoms and rights of the few. Furthermore, a truly democratic…

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Michael Ken

My journal about life in the woods. Visit intothewoods.blog to see my complete journal, photographs, and articles.