To Mask Or Not To Mask?

Using Critical Thinking To Solve Unsolvable Problems

Michael Ken

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The coronavirus has exposed a massive rift in how Americans perceive the information they use to make critical decisions. Much of this information is provided by political viewpoints they either support or oppose. One of the hottest topics of the debate has been whether or not we should wear masks.

A large portion of our nation is adamant about the need to wear a mask while another large group opposes this notion. This divide into two significant beliefs is a tale-tale sign to the critical thinker that invalid thinking is occurring on a large scale. After all, if people were using sound logic to decide about wearing masks, then most people would have arrived at the same conclusion.

Goals
The goal of this article is to help the reader use critical thinking skills to make informed decisions. It is only concerned with helping to facilitate a well-calibrated decision-making process. However, even the best methods are useless if the user is not willing to learn them. Please keep an open mind when exploring this process.

Critical Thinking
Critical thinking is a field of study based on the scientific understanding of how the human mind works. Critical thinking has taught us the strengths and weaknesses of human cognition. It shows us there are many inherent flaws in thinking that can impede your ability to arrive at a correct answer to a problem. And because some issues, like knowing how to manage the current pandemic, are incredibly complicated, it is more important than ever to mitigate the inherent flaws in logic that all humans experience. Take your current beliefs, set them aside, and join me in a thought experiment to see how your decision-making ability fares.

Politicians and Politics Are Political
A keen decision-making process has nothing to do with politics. This fact is one of the first cognitive pitfalls we have to learn to avoid when looking at the issue of wearing masks. I’m not talking about a specific political party; I’m talking about them all. The first thing you should do when looking at a problem that could adversely affect you is to recognize that using thoughts, beliefs, and feelings that are stirred by political agendas is…

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Michael Ken

My journal about life in the woods. Visit intothewoods.blog to see my complete journal, photographs, and articles.